Charlotte Relocation Guide

VOL2 ISS2 2018

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THE ORIGINAL RELOCATION GUIDE — CHARLOTTE | VOLUME 2 — ISSUE 2 26 SOUTHPARK What does a community built around a shopping mall look like? Pretty nice, actually. Some would go so far as to say, "ritzy." Located at the intersection of Fairview Road and Sharon Road, just six miles south of Uptown Char- lotte, SouthPark sits at the center of a retail mecca. Its namesake, SouthPark Mall, is the largest shopping mall not only in Charlotte — but all of North Carolina, with nearly 1.8 million square feet of retail space. Home to the likes of Burberry, Armani, and Louis Vuitton, it's surprising to learn the land the mall sits on was once a 3,000-acre dairy farm — though it's no stranger to high-end leather products. Though grand in size, the mall is just one small part of what makes SouthPark a thriving, growing community. Six of Charlotte's largest companies are headquartered in this nearly 18,000-person edge city, making it one of the largest business districts in the state, with 40,000 employees. Those include the steel manufacturer Nucor, Coca-Cola Consolidated, drywall and building materials fabricator National Gypsum Co., specialty chemical producer Albemarle Corp., engine component company EnPro Industries, and insurance broker AmWINS Group Inc. SouthPark takes pride in its success as an esteemed live-work environment and offers a wide array of home options, from quaint ranch properties to modern, multi- million-dollar estates in gated communities. Tree-lined lots give character to the Mountainbrook subdivision, home to ranch and split-levels from the 1960s and '70s, as well as a neighborhood club with a pool and tennis court. One of Charlotte's most sought-after neighbor- hoods, Barclay Downs sits adjacent to SouthPark Mall and features remodeled ranch houses from the '50s and '60s. Foxcroft, on the other hand, is experiencing a lot of new development with the construction of Three- story French Provencials and Tudors. Other SouthPark neighborhoods include Fairmeadows, Beverly Woods, and Sharon Woods. Schools are no exception to SouthPark's seemingly high standards of living. For five consecutive years, Newsweek Magazine has ranked Myers Park High School — which compares itself to a small college — as one of the best 100 high schools in the nation. East Mecklenburg High School offers both Academy of Engineering and International Baccalaureate programs to prepare students for post- secondary education. Carmel Middle School consistently meets or exceeds national standards, while Alexander Middle School holds a "Schools to Watch" designation for its dedication to excellence. SouthPark the other SouthPark ALYSSA LAFARO Once school's out, summer in SouthPark means the symphony is in town. Each June, Summer Pops brings the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra to the SouthPark Mall amphitheater for five nights of incredible performances. The 2018 event included the music of John Williams — think "Star Wars," "E.T." and "Jurassic Park" — a live musical score in sync with a showing of "Back to the Future," a night of Broadway's best-loved show tunes, a salute to America packed with patriotic favorites, and an evening with Blue Ridge Music Hall of Famers The Kruger Brothers. After the symphony, take your pick of SouthPark's diverse restaurants. Café Monte boasts affordable, high-quality French fare, its menu bursting with savory dishes like the roasted artichoke hearts with saffron aioli and tarragon crème-smothered lobster and crab crepes. Charlotte Maga- zine raves about Barrington's, stating it has "the familiarity of a corner pub with a menu that shows serious sophistica- tion." They're not wrong — just reading about the bacon- wrapped trout with sweet potato hash and the handmade parmesan gnocchi triggers the mouth watering. For a more multicultural menu, check out the Middle Eastern food at Yafo's Kitchen. Try the chicken- and quinoa –stuffed avo- cado or the Greek yogurt mac 'n cheese. Last but certainly not least, this "second uptown" wouldn't be part of Charlotte if it didn't have a brewery. In September 2018, Legion Brewing opened its second location on the ground floor of Capitol Towers. Upon entering the 12,000-square-foot space, visitors are greeted by a 360- degree circular 16-seat bar with 39 taps across four sections. The brewery also offers food, wine, cider, and craft cocktails made with liquor from local distilleries. []

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