TRIAD NC

VOL14 ISS1 2016

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THE ORIGINAL RELOCATION GUIDE—TRIAD NC | VOLUME 14—ISSUE 1 32 SURROUNDING TOWNS Surrounding Towns Small towns are often the best kept secrets. In the Triad, surprises come in many shapes and sizes and in unexpected places. Two monstrous sized straws in a milkshake form the whimsical entrance of the Dairi-O restaurant in the town of King northwest of Winston-Salem. The menu brings out the kid in every adult from burgers and grilled cheese sandwiches to salads, but the real stars are the hot dogs and milkshakes. Try any and all Triad locations including Clemmons voted the "Best in the Triad" in 2014 by YES! Weekly. To see the giant milkshake you have to go to King where Dairi-O started in 1947. Located approximately 10 miles southwest of Winston-Salem, Clemmons encompasses 12 square miles and is home to an estimated 18,627 residents. Founded in 1802 by Peter Clemmons, who was one of the frst settlers in the area, Clemmons is known for its amazing recreational opportunities. Those who like the outdoors will fnd Tanglewood Park much to their liking. This sprawling park ofers an amazing combination of streams, woodlands, and grassy pastures. It also showcases a beautiful arboretum, golf courses, horse stables that provide guided trail rides, and an aquatic center that ofers swim lanes, diving platforms, a kiddie pool, and a water slide area. Tanglewood Festival of Lights is one of the most well attended events in Clemmons. Each year, Tanglewood Park is transformed into a winter wonderland that's full of giant snowfakes and whimsical scenes. The holiday event is slated from November 10 through January 1. In Guilford County, the town of Oak Ridge bumps up to Greensboro. The town is known as the home of the Oak Ridge Military Academy, in operation since 1852 (except for during the Civil War), and the Old Mill of Guilford where guests can visit a grist mill that has been grinding corn since 1767. Oak Ridge Town Park is a point of pride for the community. It is the scene of community events, including Music in the Park, Family Movie Night and other events. At the holidays a luminary event helps support local families with a canned food drive. Phase II of the park's construction will add a performance stage, amphitheater and connecting paved walking paths. It will be operational in spring 2016. The Colfax Persimmon Festival, held annually each November, is a vintage farm festival. Festival goers learn about the fruit and contribute to upkeep of the rural farm and landscape. Demonstrations include a blacksmith, powder horn maker, apple cider maker and molasses. A Civil War and Revolutionary War camp show period items of interest. Listen to bands such as Corn Bread Revival while noshing on Brunswick stew, chicken stew and barbeque. Largely regarded as a suburb of Greensboro, Summerfeld has transformed itself from a rural farming community into a bedroom community. Located just nine miles from Greensboro in Guilford County, its residents have just a short drive to enjoy a wealth of employment opportunities and activities ofered in the big city. It is easily accessible to the regional airport and major transportation routes. With excellent schools, places for children to play and adults to relax, Summerfeld is respectful of its past, but focused on the future. Made up of rolling open and wooded countryside, residential neighborhoods, and limited commercial development, Summerfeld is committed to getting residents outside and active. The town is anticipating the completion of the Atlantic and Yadkin Greenway, a part of the state's Mountain-to-Sea trail system. When completed the trail will be 4.5 miles. Locals go to Summerfeld Farms, once called "Many Oaks," for beef and produce. Pastured land produces Angus grass fed beef and other products. The head steer named Preacher is kept in the pasture due to his calming infuence on his cattle peers. festive, countryside, and a giant milkshake BY LYNNE BRANDON

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